Gun of the Week #15: Semi Automatic Uzi Carbine that you can built yourself

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UZI Carbine with stock fully opened

Freddy’s Note:
Every week I feature a gun from my collection. This week it is a semiautomatic UZI carbine that I built myself from a new receiver and bolt and a parts kit. .  You can see all the previous gun of the week posts here.

It was amazing easy to assemble this gun. This is the first gun that I ever built. I have a 10 parts series on this website on how to get the parts your need and how to build it. The first of the 10 parts is here. It continues to 10 other posts. You will get the links to the parts vendors and all the instructions necessary to build it.  Make sure it is legal to have a semi-automatic UZI in your state before you order the parts.

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All the Parts before you build it

The short version is that you buy a fully welded receiver and a new bolt from Mckay Enterprises. Then buy a parts kit and a barrel. Then you assemble it. It takes a little sanding or filing some of the metal, but it this project can be done by anyone with a little hand tool experience.  The receiver will be have to be sent to a local gun store, while you will have to go through the standard background check. But all the other parts can be sent straight to your home.

Here is the completed uzi carbine in action at a local indoor gun range

History
The Uzi (Hebrew: עוזי‎, officially cased as UZI) is a family of Israeli open-bolt, blowback-operated submachine guns. Smaller variants are considered to be machine pistols. The Uzi was one of the first weapons to use a telescoping bolt design which allows the magazine to be housed in the pistol grip for a shorter weapon.

The first Uzi submachine gun was designed by Major Uziel Gal in the late 1940s. The prototype was finished in 1950. First introduced to IDF special forces in 1954, the weapon was placed into general issue two years later. The Uzi has found use as a personal defense weapon by rear-echelon troops, officers, artillery troops and tankers, as well as a frontline weapon by elite light infantry assault forces.

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My Uzi in it’s specially fitted violin case

The Uzi has been exported to over 90 countries. Over its service lifetime, it has been manufactured by Israel Military Industries, FN Herstal, and other manufacturers. From the 1960s through the 1980s, more Uzi submachine guns were sold to more military, law enforcement and security markets than any other submachine gun ever made.

Design
The Uzi uses an open-bolt, blowback-operated design quite similar to the Jaroslav Holeček-designed Czech ZK 476 (prototype only) and the production Sa 23, Sa 24, Sa 25, and Sa 26 series of submachineguns, from which it was inspired. The open bolt design exposes the breech end of the barrel, and improves cooling during periods of continuous fire. However, it means that since the bolt is held to the rear when cocked, the receiver is more susceptible to contamination from sand and dirt. It uses a telescoping bolt design, in which the bolt wraps around the breech end of the barrelThis allows the barrel to be moved far back into the receiver and the magazine to be housed in the pistol grip, allowing for a heavier, slower-firing bolt in a shorter, better-balanced weapon.

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Uzi with Fixed wooded Stock

The weapon is constructed primarily from stamped sheet metal, making it less expensive per unit to manufacture than an equivalent design machined from forgings. With relatively few moving parts, the Uzi is easy to strip for maintenance or repair. The magazine is housed within the pistol grip, allowing for intuitive and easy reloading in dark or difficult conditions, under the principle of “hand finds hand”. The pistol grip is fitted with a grip safety, making it difficult to fire accidentally. However, the protruding vertical magazine makes the gun awkward to fire when prone. The Uzi features a bayonet lug.

Operational use
The Uzi submachine gun was designed by Captain (later Major) Uziel Gal of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) following the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. The weapon was submitted to the Israeli Army for evaluation and won out over more conventional designs due to its simplicity and economy of manufacture. Gal did not want the weapon to be named after him, but his request was ignored. The Uzi was officially adopted in 1951. First introduced to IDF special forces in 1954, the weapon was placed into general issue two years later. The first Uzis were equipped with a short, fixed wooden buttstock, and this is the version that initially saw combat during the 1956 Suez Campaign. Later models would be equipped with a folding metal stock.

The Uzi was used as a personal defense weapon by rear-echelon troops, officers, artillery troops and tankers, as well as a frontline weapon by elite light infantry assault forces. The Uzi’s compact size and firepower proved instrumental in clearing Syrian bunkers and Jordanian defensive positions during the 1967 Six-Day War. Though the weapon was phased out of frontline IDF service in the 1980s, some Uzis and Uzi variants were still used by a few IDF units until December 2003, when the IDF announced that it was retiring the Uzi from all IDF forces.  It was subsequently replaced by the fully automatic Micro Tavor.

In general, the Uzi was a reliable weapon in military service. However, even the Uzi fell victim to extreme conditions of sand and dust. During the Sinai Campaign of the Yom Kippur War, IDF Army units reaching the Suez Canal reported that of all their small arms, only the 7.62 mm FN MAG machine gun was still in operation.

The Uzi has been used in various conflicts outside Israel and the Middle East during the 1960s and 1970s. Quantities of 9 mm Uzi submachine guns were used by Portuguese cavalry, police, and security forces during the Portuguese Colonial Wars in Africa.

Gun of the Week #2: Finnish KP-31

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My KP-31

I have always wanted a Russian PPSH-41. But I never seem to have an excess amount of money when I have seen one become available.  My second choice was  the Finnish Suomi KP-31.  I bought mine a year ago (shown above) at a gun show.  I got 3 32 round 9mm mags and a 75 round drum with the purchase.  They are re-made in the US from Parts kits by TNW Firearms I have yet to try out the 75 round drum. I know this gun is semi-automatic, but when I fire an entire 32 round mag, pulling the trigger 32 times in quick succession, it feels full auto, even thought it is only a semi.  This gun be available between $395 to $485 plus shipping and FLL fees at the time that I write this. I highly recommend this gun. Here is the history of that gun:

The Suomi KP/-31 (Suomi-konepistooli or “Submachine-gun Finland”) was a submachine gun (SMG) of Finnish design that was in service during World War II. It was a descendant of the M-22 prototype and the KP/-26 production model, which was revealed to the public in 1925. The Suomi-konepistooli KP/-31 is often abbreviated to Suomi KP.

The Suomi KP/-31 is regarded by many[3] as one of the most successful submachine guns of World War II, also the soon developed 71-round drum magazine was later copied and adopted by the Soviets for their PPD-40 and PPSh-41 submachine guns.[4] The accuracy of the Suomi was superior to that of the mass-produced PPSh-41,[4] thanks in part to a noticeably longer barrel, with the same rate of fire and the equally large magazine capacity.[4] The major disadvantage of the Suomi KP/-31 was its high production costs.

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From the TNW Site

The Suomi KP/-31 also incorporated a few new design features, including an arrangement whereby the spring was mounted inside the bolt in order to make the gun shorter. Its 50-round quad-column “Casket” box magazine was more reliable than the early 40-round “bullets loaded nose down” drum magazine, and similar applications were used on the Argentinian C-4 submachine gun and present-day 60-round 5.45x39mm AK-74 compatible magazines.

The Suomi KP/-31 went into serial production in 1931 by Tikkakoski Oy and most of these weapons were bought by the Finnish Defence Forces. The Finnish Defence Forces were equipped with about 4000 Suomi KP/-31 submachine guns when the Winter War started. During the course of the war, the design was altered with the addition of a muzzle brake, which increased the submachine gun’s overall length by 55 mm. The revised version was designated KP/-31 SJR (suujarru, or “muzzle brake”). Aimo Lahti was displeased with this revision, believing that it decreased muzzle velocity and reduced the weapon’s reliability, and even sought in vain to have the muzzle brake’s designer court-martialed. Ultimately, roughly half of the KP/-31s in Finnish service were of the SJR version. Initially the KP/-31 was issued as a substitute for a light machine gun, and proved inadequate in this role. Instead, soldiers learned by trial and error how to use submachine guns to the best effect. By the time of the Continuation War, Finnish doctrine had been altered to include both a KP/-31 and a light machine gun (usually a captured Degtyaryov DP) in every infantry squad, and by 1943 this had been expanded to two KP/-31s per squad. KP/-31 production continued with the intention of adding a third submachine gun to each squad, but this plan was shelved in 1944 when the Continuation War ended.

A specialized bunker version was also produced in very small numbers (a total of 500 built) in 1941, which barrel shroudls end is thinner and flattened to allow firing through the narrow ports of defensive bunkers.[5] This version lacked a shoulder stock and was equipped with a pistol grip. An even rarer version “900 kp 31 psv” [6]was produced for use as a secondary gun in the firing ports of Vickers Alt B Type E 6-Ton tanks, but only a few dozen were built before production was canceled due to the outbreak of the Winter War. Production never resumed, as captured Degtyaryov DP machine guns proved far superior in this role. Like the bunker version, the tank version had a pistol grip and no buttstock, and it could be quickly removed from the tank and fitted with a standard barrel shroud for infantry use if needed. The tank version remained in the Finnish Army’s inventory through the 1980s, despite the tank it was designed for being retired in 1959, possibly because the Army forgot that they existed.

The Suomi KP was also manufactured under licence in Sweden, Denmark, and Switzerland, where it was known as the Hispano-Suiza MP43/44.

In 2009, a semi-automatic version of the Suomi KP was produced for civilian sale in the United States,[7] replacing the receiver and lengthening barrel to meet the standards of the National Firearms Act.